How Does Marijuana Impact Parkinson’s?

Is Mary Jane the hottest girl at the party just by reputation, and not by actual looks?

She has certainly become the belle of the ball in the medical and therapeutic world. She comes in as the savior to all that ails us, making her eye candy for many.

Perhaps she might just have a nice personality.

Much has been made in the last 20 years about the therapeutic effects of marijuana and its ability to treat many diseases. The hysteria and hype has grown to the point what although it is a federal crime to possess and use it, 60 percent of the U.S. has passed state laws allowing for marijuana use for medical and medicinal purposes.

Much has been made about marijuana in its use as a treatment for neurological disorders, including Parkinson’s. Anecdotal stories emerged that marijuana has been effective in reducing the noted tremors which are the hallmark sign of Parkinson’s.

It was supposed to be so encouraging, that marijuana was a wonder drug for so many ailments.

However, it seems that much of the hype was covered in a cannabis cloud, so to speak.

Some clinical research has been conducted to gauge the effectiveness of cannabis (marijuana) in the wake of these anecdotes. It turns out that after all the research and the smoke had cleared (pun intended), marijuana was found to have inconclusive effect on the symptoms of Parkinson’s.

While marijuana directly impacts the brain in the area thinking and some motor skills are centered – this is where there are cannabinoid receptors, which receive cannabinoid molecules such as from cannabis – there was a belief that some of those motor functions that are hindered or are involuntary because of Parkinson’s, would be relieved when cannabis was actually introduced into the system.

What is official is that there is no unified theory about cannabis and Parkinson’s because the data does not show a consistent trend, and cannabis is difficult to study because of conflicting chemicals and their reactions to the cannabinoid receptors known as CB1 and CB2. The difficulty in establishing clear results is that cannabis has conflicting chemicals knowns as agonists and antagonists – and each plant species and each form of administering the cannabis develops different numbers of the agonists and antagonists to where there is no control available – making the data sketchy and hard to quantify.

This is not to suggest that the anecdotes are illegitimate, or that cannabis is completely ineffective – it is just that the generalized data isn’t conclusive one way or another, which means there is enough doubt that medical professionals may not have any credence to prescribing marijuana as a treatment for Parkinson’s symptoms.